Toku Eyes

Toku Eyes brings its AI platform to the US, allowing for accurate identification of...

Called ORAiCLE, it can assess the cardiovascular risk of an individual through a retinal scan, more accurately than the current gold standard.

DAI teams-up, invests in ThinkMD

Under the strategic partnership, DAI will use its extensive international network to bring ThinkMD's digital health products to new markets.
MobileODT colposcopse

MobileODT makes cervical cancer diagnostics mobile

The device and its companion app turn pretty much any smartphone into a portable colposcope, making the screening process available all around the world.
smart mole scanner

HÜD turns any smartphone into a dermatoscope

The smart mole scanner, which is designed to be attached to a smartphone's camera, is now live on crowdfunding website Indiegogo.
low-cost device to diagnose cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers develop low-cost device to diagnose cancer

The D3 system consists of a small device that attaches to the smartphone's camera to convert it into a microscope which can analyze a sample of a few cells.
MouthLab

MouthLab takes patient’s vitals from a breath

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed a handheld device that can pick up vital signs from a patient's lips and fingertip.
flu

An app that could tell whether you’ll get the flu this year

The model would allow healthcare providers to predict the spread of influenza from one person to the next over time, and turn this into actionable information.
Hoope

This ring can diagnose sexually transmitted diseases

Called Hoope, it has a retractable needle and functions as a home diagnostic tool that distributes blood into four microfluidic channels and to a lab-on-a-chip.
My Health Discovery

Johnson & Johnson unveils a health risk assessment app

Called My Health Discovery, the application asks the right questions in order to have more realistic and accurate goals for improving one's lifestyle.
Medicine Doctor Hand Working

Most online symptom checkers don’t work as advertised

Researchers from the Harvard Medical School have found that symptom checkers provided the correct diagnosis first in only 34% of cases.